Thursday, April 19, 2012

A discussion about God Bless You, Mr. Vonnegut on PCtv

Some of you might be aware that I'm a regular correspondent on Park City TV to talk about politics, media, and culture. Last night we talked exclusively about my writing, my writing process, and my book, God Bless You, Mr. Vonnegut.

It was a very fun discussion and host Terry Burden was great as always.



You can buy God Bless You, Mr. Vonnegut digitally at AmazonBarnes and Noble, or for other eReaders.

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

God Bless You, Mr. Vonnegut

It's hard to believe that we've been able to manage five years on this Earth without the wit, wisdom, and moral compass of Kurt Vonnegut.

The man influenced me more than most have. Reading his work is like visiting an old friend, his writing is warm and inviting, sharp, funny, and any of a hundred other positive adjectives.

When I learned of his death, five years ago today, I felt as though I lost a friend. The idea that I'd never read another biting essay by the man, or another new book, was not an easy one to come to terms to.

Over the years I've written a number of stories and essays that I felt were directly inspired by Vonnegut and I published them in a book called "God Bless You, Mr. Vonnegut." In it, I gave background material about my personal and one-sided artistic relationship with Vonnegut and how he influenced me over the years.

To commemorate Vonnegut on the fifth anniversary of his passing, I want to give some copies of the book away in a way that honors the man in some small, probably insignificant way.

In order to win one of the three copies I'm giving away (though that number might go up depending on how much response this gets) all you need to do is hit up your twitter account and tweet about what Vonnegut's influence was on you and tag it with #GodBlessYouMrVonnegut.

If you don't have a twitter, hit me up here on facebook and tell me how Vonnegut inspired or shaped you.

If you're not on facebook OR twitter, leave a comment below.

Confessions of an Independent Filmmaker 3: Breaking Sundance

The third part of my filmmakers guide/memoir went live on Amazon and Barnes and Noble today.

It documents what was perhaps the most stressful two weeks of my life: promoting a film during the 2004 Sundance Film Festival.

We made a film about the whole experience called The Misbehavers, but because of legal issues with those involved in it, music licensing, and the threat of lawsuits, it will never see release. In fact, I"m almost counting days until I get a cease and desist about this book. But since everything contained herein is the truth, and I have video evidence and journal entries to back up my story, I'm not too worried about anything like that affecting me.

But in case it does, buy the book now.

Here's the trailer for the movie the book is inspired by:



Here's the blurb from Amazon:

In the third part of his "Confessions of an Independent Filmmaker" series, he documents his time promoting a film called Abby Singer at the Sundance Film Festival. Abby Singer featured Brad Pitt and Jake Gyllenhaal and was renowned for its guerilla marketing campaigns. From stealing cameos to breaking into every major film studio lot to drop trailers, Abby Singer had done it all. And when it wasn't programmed in the Sundance Film Festival, the filmmakers turned to the author and his cohorts to market the film.

They navigated the strict laws against most forms of film promotion in Park City, Utah, and launched one of the most talked about marketing campaigns in the festival's history.

This first hand account brings readers through the drama, the struggles, and the marketing avenues taken to put the name "Abby Singer" on the tip of every tongue during one of the biggest independent film festivals in the world.

Be sure to check out Part 3 on on Amazon and Barnes and Noble today.

Here's Part 1 (Amazon)
And Part 2 (Amazon and Barnes and Noble)

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

Operation: Montauk - Cover Comps

For my next book, Operation: Montauk, I sought out a painter and designer who knows the pulp style inside and out. I kept looking at the art of Blain Hefner and knew I had my guy for this particular project.

I had been planning on using Erin Kubinek, my artist for Lost at the Con and God Bless You, Mr. Vonnegut, but I have employed her full time on another project and she wasn't available... Which makes me sad on one level, but she's plenty busy on a great project I will tell you about soon. And Blain was born to do this cover.

Check out this poster for Temple of Doom he did and posted on his blog:

He's clearly someone who understand the pulp aesthetic, right?

Well, Operation: Montauk is a pulp novel, through and through. Here's my brief synopsis:

"Operation: Montauk" is a time-traveling science fiction novel patterned after the pulp-adventure stories of the 1920s and 1930s.

Lost in time after a failed attempt to kill Hitler before his rise to power, World War II soldier Cpl. Jack Mallory finds himself stranded, his whole team killed, nearly 100 Million years off course. Together with a group of other wayward time travelers, Mallory has to fight to survive in a hostile environment swarming with dinosaurs. Things go from bad to worse for the group when a squad of Nazis sent back in time to protect the Fuhrer find themselves caught in the same temporal anomaly.

Well, Blain sent me some of his rough, small sketches for his idea for the cover and I couldn't be more happy about it. And I couldn't wait to share a taste of it with you. His art is money well spent.

Here is a small cross-section of the comps he sent me. I think the bottom two are the ones we're going to jump off from, but I"m curious, which one do you like the most?






Operation: Montauk comes out in June 2012. And here's Christopher Walken talking about Lost at the Con: