Tuesday, October 06, 2015

The Aeronaut and Escape Vector - Signed Pre-Orders

As many of you are aware, my collection of short stories, Escape Vector, and my new novel, The Aeronaut, are both coming next month.

Escape Vector is a dozen stories of science fiction, all of them space opera, and it's a collection I couldn't be more proud of.

The Aeronaut is a literary steampunk tale that I've poured my heart and soul into and tells the tale of Robert Preston. Preston is an American expatriate who joined the French Aeronautic Corps during World War I. Through his adventures on the battlefield and in the hospital, he meets a woman who cures his death wish, but French Intelligence has other plans for him.

I'm incredibly excited for both of these and hope you are, too.

I will be having signing events and readings local to me in Salt Lake City and there will be some more in other places through next year, but many have asked for a way to get signed physical copies directly through me.

This is how to do that. All you need to do is use the Paypal button below and I'll get these mailed out as soon as I have the physical copies which should be on or around November 11, 2015.

I'll personalize them however you want, just be sure to leave a note.

And more than anything, thank you all so much for supporting my career as a writer over all these years. Your kind words, your reviews of the books, and the fact that you keep paying for them, has made this journey both wonderful and possible.

Both books retail for $15, but if you order them together here, it's only $25 plus shipping.

If you're interested in digital copies, please go preorder The Aeronaut from Amazon here. Helping the book climb up the charts prior to release would help me immensely.

ALSO: If you need International Shipping outside the United States, let me know and I can invoice you separately for the cost of shipping.


Tuesday, September 29, 2015

The Aeronaut and my NYCC Schedule

First, the biggest news this week: My latest novel, The Aeronaut, is now available for pre-order in digital formats and will be released in digital and print on November 11, 2015 to commemorate the end of World War I.

It's being published by Silence in the Library Publishing.

Please click this link and pre-order!

Here's the back cover text:
The Aeronaut is a tense story, full of action, espionage, and romance, set in an alternate version of World War I. Computational machinery has allowed both sides to make great technological leaps that have made trench warfare even deadlier for the soldiers at the front.  
Some men go to war to defend their homeland or to prove something to themselves but Robert Preston has fled America and joined the French Army to escape heartbreak. He's placed in the 5th Aeronautic Corps, an elite unit of the French Army that specializes in jumping over trenches by means of jet packs. It's a dangerous job with a low survival rate, but Preston is determined to make a difference.  
Along the way, he meets a man he'd call his best friend and a woman he'd call the love of his life, but a top secret mission behind enemy lines and a heart full of jealousy threatens to tear the three of them apart forever. 
If you're going to get a digital copy, this is the best time for you to do it. For me, anyway. If the book climbs the charts before it even comes out, it's going to help build a momentum that will increase sales for me in the long run.

And it's not like you have to pay for it immediately. Like with any pre-order, Amazon won't take your money until the book comes out.

I'm so excited to have this book out there. It's been a delicate balancing act and probably the hardest time I've had whipping a novel into shape for publication, but I hope you find the result worth it. This is from a story that's been gestating in my head for a long time and the first draft was finished in 2012. I've written almost four whole novels between now and then and countless short stories, so I'm excited to get this out there.

Don't let anyone tell you writing or the world of publishing is a fast process. But I'm proud of what I've done and would love to hear from all of you about what you think.

So, please, pre-order the book.

And thank you all for the support you've given me over the years. It means more than you can all imagine. I'll be back with some sort of recap of Salt Lake Comic Con, too.

But in the meantime, here is my schedule for New York Comic Con.

New York Comic Con Schedule

Friday, October 9 

5:15pm EST
Room: 1A01
Popular podcasters across geekdom gather to discuss the ins-and-outs of podcasting and answer your questions. Panelists include: Holly Frey and Tracy V. Wilson (Stuff You Missed in History Class), Gregory A. Wilson (Speculate) and Bryan Young, Amy Ratcliffe and the Mike Pilot (Full of Sith).

Saturday, October 10

11:30am EST 
NYCC Live Stream Interview 
Booth: 656
Amy Ratcliffe and Bryan Young will be discussing the state of Star Wars.

9:00pm EST
Stuff You Missed in History Class - Live Show
DiMenna Center’s Mary Flagler Cary Hall
Tracy and Holly of Stuff You Missed in History Class sit down with author Bryan Young to talk about his book, “A Children's Illustrated History of Presidential Assassination.” The book, illustrated in part by Bryan’s daughter, Scout, includes all the important facts around assassinations (and failed attempts) in a way that manages to be engaging, truthful and witty all at once.
(For tickets for this live show visit New York Super Week's website)

As far as my publications for the week, I have a new piece up at StarWars.Com. The Cinema Behind Star Wars: The Third Man. It's a beautiful coincidence that a movie written by one of my favorite writers (and the one who inspired The Aeronaut) is the subject of my column the week the new book went available for preorder.

As a reminder, here's a list of "rules and guidelines" I've been collecting over my years of studying writing advice and process. There are links to dozens of essays I've written about each individual bullet point and I think some people find it helpful.

As far as my work outside of all this: There's a lot of great stuff on Big Shiny Robot! and Full of Sith for you. 

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

The Surprising Ease of Consistency

I've challenged myself to writing every day.

My writing schedule used to give me weekends off. Or when I didn't feel like it. Or whenever I felt like I was too busy for writing. In recent years I've given myself a day off here and there, but always at least one day off a week.

But the more I looked around at successful writers, people who were making a living at it full time, the more I realized that when they said "write every day," what they really meant wasn't "write every business day," or "write every day you can..." They meant "WRITE EVERY DAY."

And so I took that as a challenge.

I like challenges. It's why I like National Novel Writing Month every year, even though I don't always participate in the way they intended. I just like seeing something I need to update every day with my word count. It keeps my writing every day. I wish someone had a tool of a social website like NaNo's that works all year and tracks your annual word count. I'd find that a lot easier than just keeping track in my book.

Today I completed my 80th consecutive day of writing in a row and I'm here to tell you it works.

The first while, perhaps the first month, I got a little stressed out about keeping up with a "writing literally every day" schedule. Some days I would sputter in my writing and wonder if I was gaining any actual advantage in keeping my momentum up because I didn't quite feel like I had any. I fought through it, assuming that one month wouldn't give me a fair representation about what writing every day would do. So I pressed forth, right up until Dragon Con.

This was my first big test.

Do you know how hard it is to find a quiet space to write at a convention as crazy, crowded, and exhausting as Dragon Con? I was convinced I'd break my streak and not keep it up. It was terrifying to me.

But I kept my notebook with me everywhere and kept my laptop in the hotel room. I was able to find small spaces in the day here and there to scratch out 100 words here and a 300 words there, adding up to about 1,000 words on the novel over the course of the convention, which is a lot more than I thought I'd get. And I guarantee I wouldn't have got them if I wasn't keeping track of my consecutive days of writing streak.

I did it because I challenged myself and didn't want to break it.

After the convention, it was much easier to swing back into my writing routine and I was able to get 2,000 words written the morning after I'd arrived home from the convention.

And as the days add up, so does my word count. I've finally hit a speed that doesn't make my brain feel like it's going to melt and that average is about 1,750 words a day or so. Some days I get considerably more, some days I get less.

After 80 days, though, I've found that hitting a minimum of 1,000 words a day on my novel is no trick at all. Knowing that I'm going to be writing every day gives me permission to create ending points where I know how I'm going to resume the next day. It's gotten me more excited about what I'm writing and it's given me a reason to chew through my story ideas more thoroughly so I know what it is I'll be writing the next day.

Surprisingly, it's made me more excited about writing, rather than making it feel like a chore.

So, after 80 days, I'd say the experiment has been a wild success. I've written almost 140,000 words, my momentum is only ramping up, and I'm getting a lot done. And it's easier. Writing every day, after that first 30 days, has gotten easier and easier. In fact, it feels like it would be harder to skip it at this point.

So I'd challenge you to do the same. Tweet me. Let me know how many days and words you've covered.

I'm going to try to make it another 80 (and maybe another 80 after that),  though I'm terrified Star Wars: The Force Awakens might derail my plans and distract me. It will be tough, but if you're all participating (those of you who are writers) I'd be encouraged significantly.

So that's it for now except for updates on stuff coming out or coming up:

As some of you may know, I'm a guest at Salt Lake Comic Con and here's my schedule for that show. 

As far as works published: I have a short story in the Salt Lake Comic Con anthology coming this weekend. It's limited to 500 copies and you'll have to be at the show to get a copy. I also published a piece in Star Wars Insider #160 called Practical Magic: The Surprising Physical Effects of the Prequels. I'm really proud of that piece and you can see a preview of it on StarWars.Com.

The latest piece in my Cinema Behind Star Wars column came out as well, and I wrote about Shakespeare in Love, which is one of my favorite films.

As a reminder, here's a list of "rules and guidelines" I've been collecting over my years of studying writing advice and process. There are links to dozens of essays I've written about each individual bullet point and I think some people find it helpful.

As far as my work outside of all this: I'm keeping busy for Big Shiny Robot! and Full of Sith.