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The Last Dance

The light in the room was low, candles close to burning out over an eaten meal and an empty bottle of wine. A Frank Sinatra record played quietly in the background. It’s the last dance...

His voice was low, hushed as though he might have been hiding from an intruder. “I had a dream about you last night.”

Her reply grew soft and quiet, to match his tone, “What was it about?”

“I dreamt that we said goodbye.”

“Goodbye?”

“I woke up sad, almost crying.”

She had nothing to say. Sinatra filled in the gaps, still I want to hold you forever and more...

“I don’t know why we said goodbye, but it seemed so permanent. I got the idea in my dream that I’d never see you again and I couldn’t bear it.”

To read the rest of this story, you can purchase it here for the Kindle in the collection "The Accidental Date and Other Stories of Longing, Romance and Woe", or click the button below to order a .PDF of the collection.

The collection contains 11 other stories from me, Bryan Young.






Comments

Anonymous said…
I like this story and I honestly think it is one of your best pieces to date. The conversation was believable enough to induce an eavesdropping like effect. You wrote this at 3am? Wow!
Shelly said…
You have several great pieces, but I agree with english muffin that this is a story that feels true.
Bea said…
i love his mini monologue in the middle, it flowed and was so...perfect.
i think i'm in love with your writing lol, but everyone is always having an affair, who am i to say this to the master ( ;) ) but can you write one about married people being in love?
if you already have, can you tell me it's name?
Unknown said…
A Friend Indeed is about a well-adjusted married couple.

http://shortstorycorner.blogspot.com/2006/06/friend-indeed.html

I'm really glad you like my short stories... And people are always having affairs because they're more fun to write and think about... I think...
Unknown said…
Also, it's because Graham Greene takes over my brain sometimes.

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