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The Mighty Thor

I thought you guys might find this interesting. This is a pitch Elias and I wrote for Marvel's Thor. This would have been a cool mini-series. Maybe it still could be...

One year ago Odin slumbered. All was well in the kingdom of Asgard. Although the citizens of Asgard respect their lords rule, during the Odinsleep, Asgardians carry on more freely and with less fear of respite; for when God sleeps, so sleeps his Godly expectations. And for the sons of this God, the same rings true.

While one brother plots in the shadows, the other enjoys the tranquility and reminisces of days filled more with mischievous sibling rivalries and less with evil plots. And on some days, within the God of Evil still resides the God of Mischief. On this day at Odin’s stables mischief is afoot.

The stable door splinters into a million pieces as Loki, astride Odin’s eight legged stallion Sleipnir, rides into the Asgardian countryside in a blaze of mischievous glory. He lets out an exaggerated “YEEE HAW!” As the stallion begins to buck wildly. Suddenly a sonic boom echoes through the countryside. Loki, recognizing the sound, ducks just in time to avoid the wrath of Mjolnir. It shoots past like a bullet and plucks a horn off of his helmet. Loki cackles and continues into the wilderness, further goading Thor.

Thor realizes that if his father were to be missing his horse when he awakes from his week long slumber someone would have to pay, so Thor gives chase.

The Brothers race through the kingdom of Asgard almost playfully. Thor keeps pace with Sleipnir, but never gains. With Godspeed they fly through the Asgardian countryside, through the Temple of Mystics, through the Domain of Storm Giants, through the Norn Forest, over the River of Crystal.

For a moment Thor loses Loki, but finds Odin’s steed caged up neatly in front of a cottage in the Asgardian countryside, there seems to be a mystical lock on the cage. However strong Thor is, try as he might he can’t get the lock off of the cage. Thor shouts at the door for Loki to come out but there is no response.

He shatters the door open with his hammer to reveal...

None other than the Enchantress, dressed scantily and sprawled out on a bed like a tigress.

“Lo, Enchantress where is Loki, the bedeviler of my day?”

“Bound in the back room, my dear Thor.”

“How did thee apprehend him?”

“By seduction.”

“By my fathers beard, I’ll now take Sleipnir and away from thee. Might I have thine key to the lock?”

“There’s only one way to get it...”

Thor looks uneasy, but willing to submit.

“Lay with me, in my bed.” She says.

Thor pauses, but the sinless attitudes that go along with the playfulness of Odinsleep prevail, and we see them lock in for a kiss.

A year has passed. Sleipnir resides in his stables once again. Loki is foiled. Odin awakes. But the Enchantress, she disappears, until the time of the next great Odin sleep, which has arrived since the events a year past. But with her also comes with newborn babe. A child but whose? Loki’s or Thors? They both wonder...
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