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The Rogue's Poem

This is a poem I wrote for a character in a screenplay.

I'm no poet.

A rogue as I deserves not
beauty and perfection as she.
Virtue and titles and monies
mean nothing to those as we.
All I've wanted I've fought for,
all I've needed I've swindled,
all I've loved is you.
The love of one Julia is all I ask,
the love of one Julia is all I live for,
and to glance upon her beauty
forevermore...

Comments

Anna Russell said…
I'm so glad you decided to post some poetry, I really enjoyed reading this.
It's got an almost Shakesperean quality to it.

Hugs
Anna xxx
A.prem said…
Virtue and titles and monies
mean nothing to those as we.


nice :-)

ch33rs!
eliwingz said…
very nice... love the imageries.

if you have some time try to glance at my work also... it's nothing like yours but it would be great to have someone express what they think of it... have to warn you though that its a bit amateurish...

here's the link http://agos-payapa.blogspot.com

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