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Love and Loss

It must be spring or something, because all of this poetry is coming out of nowhere. Did someone put some type of hex on me? (Hell, I did these two just a couple of days ago, too...)

In any case, I hope this stuff doesn't suck. I've said it before and I'll say it again, I'm not a poet.

1) Love:

When I'm not with you
the only thing I can feel
is a tightness in my chest,
a deep and gorgeous thirst
for your angelic presence.

The moment I can bask in it once more,
a grin creeps across my face
and I can feel angels
hoisting my heart to the heavens.

When we drink together,
you think me a lightweight,
but my secret is this:
you intoxicate me already.

2) Loss:

It was over.
You were gone.
And in my sorrow
I took to the hills,
to clear my head,
to wonder why,
to escape the city noise.
The songs of the birds
no longer sounded sweet,
but shattered,
bitter,
and hurt.
Breathing in,
fresh mountain air
filled the hole in my heart.
Breathing out,
left that hole twice as empty.
Though I found no answers,
and left as perplexed
and as saddened as when I arrived,
at least the view was beautiful.

Comments

Anna Russell said…
"You intoxicate me already"

(girly moment coming up)

Awwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwwww! Gorgeous write.

And the second one really packs a punch.
Bryan said…
I'm glad you liked it Anna....
Maxine said…
When we drink together,
you think me a lightweight,
but my secret is this:
you intoxicate me already.

These four lines are a poem in themselves, I believe. The rest is just dressing around them. I'm enjoying your site, thanks.
Lukalock said…
these are really good, bryan


and you seem to have a special talent for endings. as stated above, they pack a punch. i always look forward to the final lines in your stories, and poems...
kamagra said…
Hi, I really enjoyed this entry, I love reading poetry and your post was almost like a drug, I could not stop until there was nothing left.

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