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Water Under the Bridge

It's been a long month, and I've been working on my Chain Story (which should be up soon), but I wanted to offer this bit below.  I've done a couple like it, but it's modeled after the short 3-6 sentence short stories in some of Hemingway's Short Story books.  I wrote one back in April of 2007 called The Rat's Nest and another one in April of 2009 called So Many Night's Ago.

Be sure to check out my recent collections available on the Kindle.




I loved you, but I found someone else to share the life with me I wanted for us. It was near impossible to let go, and I still wonder how things would have come out between us, but I couldn't wait for you any longer. I'd have been a fool to. The life I have now is so happy and so wonderful that it's hard not to think about how things could have been with you.  I wonder sometimes where you are now and think about calling, but I know you wouldn't answer.  Even if I could muster the courage to make that call and wish you luck in finding the happiness I wanted for us in someone you could stand.

Comments

Marlynn said…
Its a part of our life.
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Top Bpo Companies and Processes
EGB said…
Oh, so sad. We have all been there.

You are a beautiful writer. I'm posting a story online at www.afacebookstory-oneclickaway.blogspot.com. I hope you will take a peek. It's good to have a little audience, isn't it?
matt said…
wow your stories are really good. Maybe you could check out my short story blog. It's
http://stillframesandstilettos.blogspot.com
MuddassirShah said…
well written Bryan
cory said…
Nice, you hit the nail and the head and came back around again.
Anonymous said…
good story

try selling your short stories at http://www.whiffyskunk.com
Hi there,
I'm from Sydney Australia.
I've also created a chain story blog. Hope you can try it out!
http://peoplesstory.wordpress.com/the-story-so-far/
Arunima said…
It's very well written. :)
Mary said…
Hi Bryan, I just stumbled across your blog - you've got a lot of great stuff posted.

I hope you'll check mine out - I have a lot of flash fiction on it that you might like. :)

Can't wait to see your next post!
Harrison R said…
Was very sad, but interesting, please write more...

im also working on a similar sad story called "Date with Destiny" - but it may take a few days, but please check it out when you can at

http://unofficialstorybank.blogspot.com/

Well done and keep it up, your a fantastic writer :)

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