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An Award

I was informed last week that I was to be the recipient of the Mayor’s Artists Award in the Literary Arts category, presented annually by the Mayor of Salt Lake City and the Utah Arts Festival.

Here's the pertinent portions of the press release:


Salt Lake City, UT: Since 1992 the Salt Lake City Mayor’s Office has recognized individuals and organizations that have made significant contributions to the artistic landscape of the community. The Utah Arts Festival and the Salt Lake City Mayor’s office are honored to present the Mayor’s Artists Awards during the Festival on Friday, June 21st on the Festival Stage at 8:15 pm. 
This year’s five recipients are Karen Horne – Visual Arts; Mary Ann Lee – Performing Arts; Bryan Young – Literary Arts; Frank McEntire – Service to the Arts by an Individual; and RadioWest – Service to the Arts by an Organization. (Biographies below)
Bryan Young – Literary Arts 
Bryan Young works across many different mediums. As an author, he’s written the bestselling comedy “Lost at the Con,” the critically acclaimed pulp sci-fi adventure “Operation: Montauk,” and dozens of short stories in various anthologies. As a film producer, his last two films (“This Divided State” and “Killer at Large”) were released by The Disinformation Company and were called “filmmaking gold” by The New York Times. He’s also published comic books with Slave Labor Graphics and Image Comics. He’s a contributor for the Huffington Post and StarWars.Com, has a regular column in the Salt Lake City Weekly, and is the founder and editor in chief of the geek news and review site Big Shiny Robot! The Chicago Tribune also named him one of the “Hottest Geek Guys of 2013.”
Andy Wilson wrote about this and other honors I've won over at Big Shiny Robot! Sean Means at the Salt Lake Tribune wrote it up also.

I hope to see at least some of you at the awards ceremony at the Arts Festival. I'm told I'll be given the award and a check.

I'll have more announcements about this and other bits of news surrounding this particular announcement soon.
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