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Utah Humanities Book Festival


Tomorrow, I'll be at the Utah Humanities Book Festival doing a reading from The Serpent's Head (or Andy Wilson, Boy Super-Genius) and then answering questions about writing and publishing.

I'd love to see you all there.

It's at the Downtown Salt Lake City Library and I'll be speaking in the 4th floor conference room at noon. Some of my books will also be around and on sale.

Here's their official write-up:

The City Library will play host to authors Bryan Young, Barry Deutsch, and Matthew Kirby.

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
Noon 
Bryan YoungLevel 4, Conference RoomBryan Young works across many different mediums. As an author, he’s written the bestselling comedic novel Lost at the Con and the critically acclaimed sci-fi adventure Operation: Montauk and most recently, A Children’s Illustrated History of Presidential Assassination. As a film producer, his last two films (This Divided State and Killer at Large) were released by The Disinformation Company and were called “filmmaking gold” by The New York Times. He’s also published comic books with Slave Labor Graphics and Image Comics. He’s a contributor for the Huffington Post and StarWars.com, and the founder and editor-in-chief of the geek news and review site Big Shiny Robot!

2pmBarry DeutschLevel 4, Conference RoomBarry Deutsch lives in Portland, Oregon, in a bright blue house with bubble-gum pink trim. His two critically acclaimed Hereville graphic novels, about “yet another troll-fighting 11-year-old Orthodox Jewish girl,” have won a Sydney Taylor Book Prize and the Oregon Book Award. He is currently at work on a third Hereville book.

4pmMatthew KirbyLevel 4, Conference RoomMatthew J. Kirby is the critically acclaimed and award-winning author of the middle grade novels The Clockwork ThreeIcefallThe Lost KingdomInfinity Ring Book 5: Cave of Wonders, and The Quantum League series. He was named a Publishers Weekly Flying Start, he has won the Edgar Award for Best Juvenile Mystery, the PEN Center USA award for Children’s Literature, and the Judy Lopez Memorial Award, and has been named to the New York Public Library’s 100 Books for Reading and Sharing and the ALA Best Fiction for Young Adults lists. He is a former school psychologist, and currently lives in Utah with his wife and three step-kids.


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