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My FanX 2015 schedule


Here is my schedule for Salt Lake Comic-Con's FanX this weekend. I will also have a table (Purple 6) where I'll be selling and signing books throughout the convention.
Thursday:
6:00pm What we know about Star Wars: The Force Awakens - Room 250A
Friday:
3:00pm Full of Sith Podcast - Ballroom C
4:30pm Mythology of Star Wars - Ballroom B
6:30pm Art of Star Wars - Ballroom B
8:00pm Ray Park - South Ballroom
Saturday:
12:30pm Why the Prequels Make the Classic Trilogy Better - Ballroom B
5:00pm Star Wars Rebels - Room 250a
7:00pm Telling Stories in RPGS (Moderating) - Room 150g

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