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Hiatus Ended


As many of you might have noticed, I've been gone from this space for a bit.

Life has been pretty busy.

There were holidays, deadlines, cruises, and ski trips.

Sure, I've been jet-setting around the world, but part of that has been refueling my creativity. That's something we should all give ourselves permission to do. I didn't stop writing, I just turned the spigot off on a few things I was doing regularly so I could enjoy myself and really soak in what was around me and reconnect with my family.

It was good for my mental health, it was good for my family life, it was great for my kids. But more than that, it was good for my writing.

After all of the things I've seen and done, I have many ideas for stories. After spending so much time with my kids, I'm full of new perspective. After reading so much during those lazy days, I have so much creative energy.

It's good to give yourself some space to explore.

That's I always seem to need but never realize. I get anxious thinking about falling behind on my to-do list, but things always manage to work out. I hit my deadlines and nothing breaks. Realizing it is hard sometimes, but necessary.

I talked to so many people and learned how things I'd had no frame of reference for worked, whether that was the tourist industry in Cozumel, life for the crew on a cruise ship, or what it's like to be snowed in in a cabin. I learned things. And in that learning, my writing will benefit.

I've seen a lot of things in the last two months, I hope to see much, much more.

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As for my writing, I've done a lot in these last two months. I've written pieces for Howstuffworks, StarWars.Com, and Big Shiny Robot!

I'll be posting much of my coverage from the Star Wars Day At Sea soon. And I'm still cranking out short stories. My Patreon short story for January is about to come out in a couple of days.

I'll get back to regularly posting links next week on the blog.

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As a reminder: Please join my short story Patreon here.  Your contributions to the Patreon help me write more like this.

The Aeronaut and Escape Vector are still out and still need your purchases and reviews. If nothing else, they can use you telling people about them. If you want signed copies, visit the shop here on this page.

As far as my work outside of all this: There's a lot of great stuff on Big Shiny Robot! and Full of Sith for you. 

And please, please, please don't forget to check out any of my books, drop reviews of them on Amazon or Goodreads, and follow me on twitter and Facebook!

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