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Want to get Lost at the Con for Free?

For the next 90 days, Lost at the Con will be part of the Kindle Lending Library, meaning that you can go to Amazon and check Lost at the Con out as though it was from the library. And with their new fund for their library, I'll get paid for you to go read my book for free.

But it gets better. If joining up on Amazon Prime isn't your thing, I'll be giving Lost at the Con away for Kindle this weekend. On Saturday, December 17th, for one day only, you'll be able to get Lost at the Con digitally FOR FREE.

No strings attached.

(Though I'd love it if you reviewed the book and told your friends about it.)

Just visit Amazon this weekend and download the book.

If you're still on the fence, feel free to read what the critics have been saying about it:
Andy Wilson, Huffington Post:

"Young's style is terse and crisp. He writes in a way that compels you to keep flipping pages as you delve deeper and deeper into what is either the strangest of cultures you will ever enjoy or something warm and familiar to all geeks who go to these types of cons...Young writes with a familiarity of this subject in a way that blends the best of gonzo journalism with comic book/pulp sensibilities wrapped with just a tiny bit of a noir vibe -- perhaps that comes from the omniscient first person narrative style. But if I had to compare it to anything else, I'd call it Hell's Angels meets Breakfast of Champions meets Amazing Spiderman."

Amy Ratcliffe, Geeks With Curves:
"Young's hard-hitting style pulled me into the story immediately. The dialogue and story move in a direct and snappy tone. No time and words are wasted but nothing is rushed or bland...This book has appeal for both geeks and new initiates like Cobb. From the geek perspective, it's fun because you have the inside knowledge and you get to feel a little superior to Cobb. You'll recognize the setting, but you'll still be surprised by where events lead. I recommend checking it out."

Brett Schenker, Graphic Policy:

"The book’s concept is great, only bettered by it’s execution...The book is solid. It’s entertaining, funny, eye opening (if you’ve never been to a convention), over the top (but realistic) and most of all it has heart. You care about Cobb towards the end, and while it’s not some amazing transformation like an After School Special, he shows enough growth that you’re cheering for him by the end. If you like gonzo journalism, politics or conventions, really if you like a good read, this is a definite buy and read."

[insertgeekhere]:

"Young’s writing is direct and keeps a quick pace. The book is funny and smart and thought provoking. That is why it is the perfect book for geeks and non-geeks alike. So follow Cobb on his wild ride and enter now!" 
Kate McIlvane, The Girl Who Was Plugged iN:
"Have you ever stayed up late reading a book, only to dream about the book, wake up early and properly slack off so you can finish it? THAT is a 7/8 Sleepless Hours book. Or in book terms: Lost at the Con by Bryan Young. In short, one of the funniest books I've read... If you have ever been to ComicCon or Dragon*Con, you need to read this romp of a book, just for the geekster eggs."

Carrie Clevenger, Mindspeak:
"A fun ride, even for non-geeks. I recommend this book to anyone looking for a book to have you laughing out loud for real. Bryan Young is a very skilled writer with wonderful character development skills, a bonus in my book. I look forward to his future releases."

And please, don't forget to visit the new shop.

Comments

Darth_Icarus said…
My Nook is weeping.
Mario L said…
I'm glad I just bought a second hand Kindle 3... W00t!

Recommending this to my peeps. =D
Rhionnach said…
Your link goes to Amazon US. Does the same thing apply for Amazon UK?
Bryan said…
I'm reasonably certain it does. If not, shoot me an email. bryan at bigshinyrobot.com
Rhionnach said…
Amazon Uk doesn't appear to have a lending library.

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