Skip to main content

Audiobooks are the Future of Indie Publishing

Writing a book and publishing it seems challenging enough, but producing a professional quality audiobook on top of that seems like it's a bridge too far for most. There aren't anywhere near as many audio books coming out as there are books of every nature on the self-publishing market.

Assuming you're someone people will want to read in the first place, the more you have to offer, the larger the audience you'll be able to reach.

I think audio books are that next bridge.

Right now, there's no filter, technology, or skill gap between someone who suddenly decides they're a writer and posts a story to Amazon or Barnes and Noble and a writer working their whole life to hone their craft, polish stories, and make sure only their best work gets published. As long as the covers and descriptions look good on both products, the consumers won't know the difference until afterward.

But one way to set yourself apart is a properly produced audiobook.

Since a professionally produced audio book is something that's either expensive to hire out or time intensive to do yourself (if you even have the right equipment), I think it will become one of the many hallmarks readers will use to distinguish the wheat from the chaff.

More than that, I think with the way media consumption is today, it will expand the potential audience of your material more than almost anything. We all know someone (lots of people even) who never pick up a physical copy of a book but will listen to ten audio books a month, whether it's on their commute or while they're performing other tasks.  It's the ubiquitous podcast-listening crowd. And they're a huge market.

I even had one bookstore owner ask if I had an audiobook version because he wanted to read the book before putting it on the shelf but would rather listen to it instead. Hell, I have members of my family who haven't read my book because they're waiting for the audio version.

To that end: I'm almost done with the audiobook for Lost at the Con. It was supposed to be done last year, but I got sick and lost my good reading voice so I had to put it off. I'll be recording the last two chapters today and manufacturing the CDs next week in time for my signings on February 18th.

If you have the capability of professionally recording an audio book for your material, I would suggest doing it. Indie publishers simply need to get into that game. I truly believe it's the next step to be taken that will expand readership, differentiate more professional from fly-by-night, and add to the profitability of being an independently published author. You're running a business and you want to monetize every possible distribution avenue for your products. Period.

If you want to pre-order the Lost at the Con audio book, I'll be sending out CDs (that include the digital versions of the book) next week.






On a side note:

My newest eBook: Confessions of an Independent Filmmaker - Part 1 is free for the Kindle today and tomorrow. And tomorrow, The Whiskey Doctor and other stories of the new Great Depression will be free for Kindle as well. I would appreciate it greatly if you were to check them out and, if you liked them enough, write a review on Amazon for me.
Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Anatomy of an Opening: The End of the Affair

Instead of breaking down a scene from a movie, this time we'll break down the opening of a book. (Previously, I've done scenes from City Lights, Citizen Kane, Raiders of the Lost Ark, and Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.  I've also broken down the opening to Starship Troopers.

Graham Greene's The End of the Affair is absolutely one of my favorite books. The writing is lyrical and story heart-wrenching and beautiful. Greene's style of writing is such that he always has me gripped, whether it's the beginning of the book or the end. And he shows you so much about the character in his opening lines.

So, here are the first two paragraphs from the book:
A story has no beginning or end: arbitrarily one chooses that moment of experience from which to look back or from which, to look ahead. I say 'one chooses' with the inaccurate pride of a professional writer who - when he has been seriously noted at all - has been praised for his technical ability, but d…

The Symbiotic Relationship Between Art and Politics

Art is inherently political.

Let's just get that out of the way. We all have things we want to say (or things we want to not say) in our personal lives that shape the art we make. And artists, more often than not, are trying to say something with their art, even if their goal is to not say something.

There is no doubt that this has been a turbulent week in the country I live in. There are many of us that are confused and shocked and afraid of what might be to come in the future. That's understandable. As artists and writers, I feel like we're typically more empathetic than the general population. It's easy to think about what it's like to be in someone else's shoes because we spend so much of our creative time almost literally in someone else's shoes. And we need to pass that understanding on to our readers or viewers or however else they're consuming this art.

I've seen this troubling idea, though, that art needs to be purely for escape and that p…

50+ Rules and Tips About Writing I've Collected Over the Years

I have twenty or thirty notebooks and journals filled up with snippets about writing, my plans for stories, bits of dialogue, interesting ideas, plotlines, scraps of short stories, and a dozen other things. I carry one with me at all times and it takes me a couple of months to fill one up.

One of the things I've kept in one of my notebooks was a collection of writing tips and rules that I've collected over the years in my travels. From teachers, from books, from wherever. Most of my career has been spent screenwriting, so a lot of these are most applicable to that, but I wanted to present them so they might be of use to you as well.

I've never stopped collecting these over the years and I never will.

To start the list are Kurt Vonnegut's eight rules of writing. They are the first in my notebook and, I think, the most useful. I'll add a star to those I think are applicable most to screenwriting. Some of these aren't applicable to everyone in every situation, but…