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Awards and Updates!

It's been a hectic month, to be sure, but I wanted to stop in with some good news and some announcements.



Firstly, Operation: Montauk has been nominated for a Cybil award in the Science-Fiction and Fantasy category in the Teen age group. There's quite a few nominees, including Silence in the Library's other book released this year, War of the Seasons: Book 2 - The Half Blood. You can check out the full list here. 

If you still haven't read the book and want to see why it would have been nominated, pick up a signed copy in the store, at Amazon or Barnes and Noble.

I'm not expecting to win (especially if I'm up against War of the Seasons) but it's a thrill to be nominated.

I also wanted to thank everyone I met at Anime Banzai this weekend. The response to the books was great and I was humbled to hear how many people enjoyed them. I'm told I caused many sleepless nights at the con because people didn't want to put down my stuff and it was great to hear.

As a heads up, if you happen to be at the Geek Media Expo (GMX) in Nasville, TN this weekend, I'll be there. I'm on a number of panels relating to writing, publishing, and even Star Wars. I'll be signing books all weekend, too. I hope to see some of you there.

I also wanted to point everyone to my latest piece for the official Star Wars website. This one is about Alfred Hitchcock's Notorious and its influence on The Clone Wars.

And don't forget to check out my audio horror stories on youtube as read by Marcus. They're perfect for getting you into the Halloween spirit.

And here's an interview I did:

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