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Curse of the Werewolf

I've just released a new, three story collection of werewolf themed shorts on Amazon and Barnes and Noble called "Curse of the Werewolf."

The stories contained inside vary in length, but it runs about 16,000 words total, which Amazon calculates out to about 45 pages of horror content, just in time for Halloween.

The first story in the collection is a brand new tale called "The Black House" about a lovesick teenager trying to unravel the mystery of the Black family, whose decrepit house and unusual daughter have caught his eye.

The second story is called "A Pistol Full of Silver" which first appeared on this website and my "Man Against the Future" collection and features the story of a man hunting something monstrous that has attacked his family.

The third story is another all new, original tale called "Fenrir's Lament." It's set in the desert in the 1950s and reads like I imagine some of that era's more pulpy magazine horror stories would be.

It's the perfect, brisk read for an autumn evening of reading atmospheric horror tales.

As an added bonus, "A Pistol Full of Silver" has been recorded for the audio book version of "Man Against the Future" and is available to stream on youtube below.


As an even bigger added bonus, there have been two other short stories from "Man Against the Future" released on youtube for you to listen to, all perfect for Halloween. The first one is Hatchet, a zombie story, and The Hero and the Horror, a vampire tale. The complete audiobook will be available before the end of fall. And don't forget to pick up "The Curse of the Werewolf"  on Amazon and Barnes and Noble.
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