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Origins!



This week I will be heading to Origins Game Fair in Columbus, Ohio. Every year it's a chance for me to hang out with fellow writer friends, as well as Star Wars nerds from Club Jade. But I also get an opportunity to teach some classes in writing and do some gaming as well. The crowd there always has great questions and I learn as much from them as I hope they learn from me.

Working a convention is something writers, I think, need to be more accustomed to in this day and age. It's a great place to meet fellow professional writers (and drink with them after hours), it's a great place to meet editors, and to network with other people in the industry. It's also a great way to meet people who might like your work or who might be interested in your work but had never been exposed to you.

One of the things that Origins does that I love is pools all of the authors together for an anthology. This year the theme is "Robots" and if you've read Escape Vector and are a fan of Sasha Blackheart, you'll be pleased to know that there's a story in there where she is engaged in mortal combat with an automaton. It's called "Ratchet's Revenge," and I hope you'll all enjoy it when you're able to get your hands on it.

Here is my schedule, and, over the next few weeks, I'll bring back reports from all of these panels and (possibly) audio from them. When I'm not on a panel, I'll be at a table in the Origins Library with authors like Mike Stackpole and Tim Zahn, signing books and copies of Star Wars Insider.

Thursday, June 16, 2016

11:00 am Freelancing 101 - Fellow panelists include John Helfers and Chantelle Aimee Osman.

6:00 pm Story Hour - Reading with Jennifer Brozek and I.

Friday, June 17, 2016

2:00 pm Incorporating History in Fiction - Fellow panelists include Dylan Birtolo, Daniel Myers, Richard C. White, and Kelly Swails.

3:00 pm Writing for the Middle-Grade/Young Adult Market - Fellow panelists include Kelly Swails and Aaron Rosenberg.

4:00 pm Robots in Speculative Fiction - Fellow panelists include Don Bingle, Sheryl Nantus, Aaron Rosenberg.

Saturday, June 18, 2016

1:00 pm Crowdfunding 101 - Fellow panelists include Don Bingle and Jaym Gates.

3:00 pm Social Networking 101 - Fellow Panelists include Chantelle Aimee Osman, Lucy A. Snyder, Gail Z. Martin, and Addie J. King.

6:00 pm Screenwriting - Fellow panelists include Chantelle Aimee Osman.

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Aside from the release of the Robots Anthology from Origins, I've had some other pieces come out.

The latest in my "Playlist" series for StarWars.Com came out, and it's all about Grand Moff Tarkin. 

I'm still hip-deep in revising my epic fantasy novel and have begun outlining my epic sci-fi novel, so I expect to start drafting that sooner rather than later. I've also turned over a lot of work for my StarWars.Com and Fantasy Flight Games gigs. More info as I have it on when things are released.

And don't forget to preorder The Best of Star Wars Insider #2, which I provided many of the essays for!
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As a reminder: The Aeronaut and Escape Vector are still out and still need your purchases and reviews. If nothing else, they can use you telling people about them. If you want signed copies, visit the shop here on this page.

As far as my work outside of all this: There's a lot of great stuff on Big Shiny Robot! and Full of Sith for you. 

And please, please, please don't forget to check out any of my books, drop reviews of them on Amazon or Goodreads, and follow me on twitter and Facebook!
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