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Christopher Walken, Marcus, and many other things

First off, let me give you Christopher Walken's pitch for you to buy Lost at the Con:

Ok. I lied. That wasn't really Christopher Walken. That was Marcus, the world famous comedian. You might remember him from his time on Last Comic Standing. We were just having a bit of fun with that video.

He really liked my collection of science fiction short stories, Man Against the Future, and when I asked if he'd record the audio book, he leapt at the chance. Literally. Jumped. Leaping. Right through the air.

After he got back to the ground, we started recording. We're about halfway done with that process and we're in the post-production phase for quite a bit of it as well. It's just such good stuff, his reading is far beyond what I'd be able to do, and I wanted to share with you a taste of the audio book.

Here is the complete, unabridged version of "The Hero and the Horror" a vampire story I wrote for the collection.

I really think he knocked it out of the park.

The audio book will be made available by Origins Game Fair, hopefully sooner. I'll get more information as soon as I get it.

In the meantime, work on Operation: Montauk goes on in earnest. We're still chugging away at the deadline and I can't tell you how much I'm enjoying Blain's work on the painting for the cover.

Also! Big announcement:

Free Comic Book Day:

I will be appearing at Dr. Volt's Comic Connection for Free Comic Book Day. It is Saturday, May 5th, at 2043 East 3300 South in Salt Lake City. I'll have a free book to give away that contains a short story from Man Against the Future and a preview of the first chapter of Operation: Montauk. Also buttons. Lost at the Con buttons. I'll be signing and selling books, too, including the audio book CD of Lost at the Con.

Kat Martin will be there as well, hawking her art, which is always a good time. We'll be accompanied by the Mandalorian Mercs. And did I mention all the free comics? I've got more announcements coming soon as well, so be sure to stay tuned!

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