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Signings and publicity...

As many of you know, I'll be premiering Operation: Montauk at the Origins Game Fair. I'm a guest in The Library and will be on all sorts of panels about writing. But I have yet to book an event here at home in Salt Lake City. That changed yesterday, actually, and I am pleased to announce that my very first reading and signing in my hometown will be at The King's English.

The event is June 8, 2012 and starts at 7:00 pm. There will be a reading, light refreshments will be served, and I will then be signing copies of the new book.

The King's English is located at 1511 South 1500 East in Salt Lake City.

I look forward to seeing you all there. You can check their website for more information about the event.

It has also come to my attention that I've made no formal announcement in this space that I have acquired a publicist for this project. Consetta Parker from Parker Publicity will be representing me as a publicist during the launch of this book. Consetta is a great person and well known in the geek community. She handles publicity duties for such prestigious people and places as Rancho Obi-Wan, James Arnold Taylor, and the ever adorable Cat Taber, among others.

You can check out her website here. If you have need of publicity services, I can't recommend her enough.

I also got word on another review of Operation: Montauk coming soon...  Things are looking good.
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